President of Nokomis Club, Redmond — Letter to the Editor of Redmond Reporter

Standard

In response to your article, “Old Nokomis Building may find a new home in Redmond,” which appeared in last week’s issue (July 10), neither myself nor any member of the Nokomis Club participated in any discussion or decision to move the building elsewhere.  Although at my own initiative in February 2014, I  spoke with Bart Phillips, CEO of One Redmond, the purported owner of the Nokomis Building and twice with Redmond ‘s Historic Preservation Officer.  No further conversations with any city official about the Nokomis Building, Redmond’s first library building, ever took place.

The mayor, acting on his own volition, convened an exclusive meeting on June 29th with two representatives of the Redmond Historical Society.  On July 7th, a staff report  the mayor had requested was delivered to the city council, who then voted to move the building away from Redmond’s historic downtown. The council meeting was held just two days before the Nokomis Club appeal began in protest of the city’s decision to allow the demolition of the Nokomis Building.

The council’s decision to move the building far from the original location that made it important jeopardizes its eligibilty as a nationally registered historic place according to Greg Griffith, Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer, State Department of Archeology and Historic Preservation. The Nokomis Building has been eligible for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places for 17 years. Because historic preservation is a national program administered by the Federal Department of the Interior, the Nokomis Building’s status gives it the same protection against adverse conditions, such as relocation, as a nationally registered historic place.

Since there has been absolutely no discussion with me about the building disposition by any city official, the Nokomis Club has never negotiated or agreed to any financial arrangement regarding relocation.  In fact,the City of Redmond’s adopted Comprehensive Plan states in policy CC-30:  “Acquire historic properties when feasible.”

The property, once the back garden of Irene and Alfred Brown’s home, was donated specifically for Redmond’s first library building.  The site is as significant as the building itself.

Let’s save the Nokomis Building for community use as the women of the Nokomis Club of Redmond have long desired.

Sincerely,

Alexa Munoz

President, Nokomis Club of Redmond

Nokomis Club of Redmond needs to raise approximately $25-$50,000 in order to pay for legal fees and representation as they appeal the decision to deny the historic significance of the Nokomis building in Redmond.  The hearing appealing the City of Redmond’s “Decision of Non-Significance” was held July 9th and 10th.  We are awaiting a decision on the appeal.

A separate appeal has been filed regarding the EPA’s classification of the building.

If you are interested in helping with their fight, please consider donating funds via PayPal on the Nokomis Club website or through their Crowdrise site (both listed below).

Contact the Redmond Nokomis Club:

Nokomis Club of Redmond

P.O. Box 7012 

Bellevue, WA  98008-1012

Website:  www.nokomisclub98052.com

Crowdrise site:  https://www.crowdrise.com/HistoricRedmondsFirstLibrary/fundraiser/kristenbryant

Advertisements

Letter to the Editor, Redmond Reporter

Standard

Re:  July 10, 2015 edition

Thank you for printing my letter about the campaign kick-off for Mayoral Candidate, Steve Fields in your July 10th edition (pages 4 and 5).

I was somewhat taken aback by the Editor’s Note added into my submission as it directed readers to the Nokomis story on page 2 and 3.  I did not consent to the insertion of the note; which was bad enough.  In addition, the story regarding the Nokomis building was not accurate in reporting the commentary and decisions of the Redmond City Council during their July 7th meeting.

During that council meeting, Rosemarie Ives, former Mayor of Redmond and community activist spoke during the “Items from the Audience” segment about the Nokomis building, and read a few selections from the roughly 25 pieces of correspondence sent to the City; including stories of children from Redmond Elementary being escorted from the school to the building (at that time used as the town library). Women were granted the right to vote in 1920 and 14 years after that in 1934 the women of the Redmond Nokomis club petitioned the WPA for funds to build the library building.  It was noted in her speech that not only is the building of historical significance, but the property as well.

Council members on the whole were supportive of the move, however it was very clearly stated that the city would only be donating the park property if the funds for moving the structure were privately raised.  One council member suggested that the amount necessary to move, stabilize and make the building functional for public use was “a rather high cost” for a building that is “not a landmark, but a building of historic interest”.

Mayor Marchione clearly stated that there would be a time limit in which the funds (for moving the structure) would need to be raised in order for the City to continue the donation of the park land and that there would be no delay of the permitted project by NBE while the funds were being raised.   NBE has offered to spend roughly $40,000 to incorporate ‘elements and materials from the Nokomis building’ into the new development.  A placard and a few pieces of lumber in a meeting room is a poor memorial to the women of Redmond who provided the town with its first library.

The City may feel that $600,000 is a “high cost” to maintain a piece of our city’s history; but losing our past is a price that we should not be willing to pay.

Paige Norman
Education Hill, Redmond

City Council Meeting July 7 2015 (**Contains Opinion**)

Standard

Please review the Agenda packet and video for complete information on the meeting.

Agenda here (with packet)
On Demand Video of meeting here (July 7 meeting not on site yet)

Observations on the general meeting:

  • The Poet Laureate for Redmond (to be sworn in July 21st) is not a resident of the City of Redmond, but of Ballard.

  • During the Ombudsperson reports for the month of June, Councilmember Hank Myers reported that a complaint from a citizen had been received about panhandlers in Redmond and what could be done about them.  Mr. Myers responded that if aggressive or violent, the Redmond Police Department should be called and report the incident.  He also noted that panhandling is not illegal in the City due to 1st Amendment rights.

***

  • Rosemarie Ives, former Mayor of Redmond and community activist spoke during the “Items from the Audience” segment of the meeting.  She spoke with regards to the Nokomis Building and read a few selections from the 25 letters sent to the City; including stories of children from Redmond Elementary being escorted from the school to the building (at that time used as the town library).

    Women were granted the right to vote (1920) and 14 years after that (1934) the women of the Redmond Nokomis club petitioned the WPA for funds to build the library building.  It was noted in her speech that not only is the building of historical significance, but the property as well.

***

In the Staff Reports segment of the meeting, Craig Larsen, Director of the Parks Department presented a report on possible spots to relocate the Nokomis Building.  Several sites were considered; two moving companies were contacted and an estimate was received from one.  The two most relevant sites are Martin Park and Arthur Johnson Park.

  • Arthur Johnson Park is located at 7901 196th Ave NE.  According to the City’s website, the park is 15 acres of undeveloped property available for passive outdoor activities.

  • Martin Park is located on the North side of Union Hill Road east of the Evans Creek Bridge.   This park site only appears on one or two of the city maps and no further information is available.

  • Estimates were given for two possibilities:  Moving the building and placing on cribbing (non-functional for public use) or moving and placing on a foundation and repairing/updating the facility for public use.

  • The Nokomis building would be move in three pieces (chimney and two porches excluded) separately.  Estimates include the cost of moving lights and signals as necessary, traffic facilitation and either cribbing (stacking on wooden blocks to stabilize) or placing on a foundation.

  • To move the structure to Martin Park the cost for cribbing would be $193,440; to move and make available for public use the cost was estimated at $580,320.

  • To move the structure to Arthur Johnson Park, cribbing cost was estimated at $228,384; public use cost estimated at $752,544.

  • The estimated value of the 1/2 acre of park land given by the city was noted as approximately $130,700.  If the land was privately owned the cost would be estimated at approximately $300,000.  The city would be agreeing to donate the cost of the property only; moving fees and related expenses would need to be privately funded (not paid for by City).

  • Mr. Larsen noted that these costs were in line with previous projects for relocation of historic buildings he had completed in Lynwood (WA).

Questions from the Council members:

  • Mr. Stillin asked if the costs would vary if the building were placed on private property and not used for public use.  Mr. Larsen answered, yes costs would be different.

  • Mr. Myers asked about the public interest of moving the structure.  He also asked if other parks had been considered:

        Smith Woods too difficult to access

    Anderson Park is not “suitable”

  • Rob Odle a Planning Director in the Planning Department stated that One Redmond would be involved in crowdfunding for the project.

  • Mr. Myers noted that the property/building was not significant; only historic and that Mr. Pantley (of NBE the new owner of the property and subsequent building project on site) had offered to incorporate a few items of interest from the (to be) demolished building into conference or meeting spaces in the new project at an estimated cost of approximately $40,000.

  • Mr. Myers asked who would be responsible for the costs of moving and renovation.  Mr. Larsen replied that private funding or crowdfunding would be used for moving and renovation; the City was only exploring donating the land for use.

  • Mayor Marchione clarified that the City was only donating the park land for use, not funding the project and that a time limit for fund raising would be set.

  • Mr. Flynn asked if Marymoor had been investigated; Mr. Larsen responded that Marymoor belongs to King County and was not used as criteria.

  • Ms. Allen asked if Luke McRedmond Landing had been under consideration; Mr. Larsen responded that there were water table issues for the site and accessibility for the move would be difficult.

The council voted unanimously to donate the park land for the move, contingent on funding availability from private or other sources.

***

Nokomis Club of Redmond needs to raise approximately $25-$50,000 in order to pay for legal fees and representation as they appeal the decision to deny the historic significance of the Nokomis building in Redmond.  The hearing appealing the City of Redmond’s “Decision of Non-Significance” is scheduled to begin July 9th and 10th.

A separate appeal has been filed regarding the EPA’s classification of the building.

If you are interested in helping with their fight, please consider donating funds via PayPal on the Nokomis Club website or through their Crowdrise site (both listed below).


Contact the Redmond Nokomis Club:

Nokomis Club of Redmond
P.O. Box 7012
Bellevue, WA  98008-1012

Website:  www.nokomisclub98052.com

Crowdrise site:
https://www.crowdrise.com/HistoricRedmondsFirstLibrary/fundraiser/kristenbryant

 

Couch with end tables (Craft)

Standard

I do NOT Pinterest or Etsy.  I waste/spend enough time on Facebook as it is (if you’ve seen my house you’ll know this is the truth).

I do not consider myself a ‘crafty’ person; but I do possess some skills.  I can sew, I can type/word process, I have office and phone skills, I can paint, I can identify a good many tool items and I love hardware stores.  IN fact, I’d rather spend hours in a hardware store than a shopping mall.

Every now and then I delude/convince myself that I can do a project.  I’ve done a macramé plant holder, embroidery, a quilt (with a friend), installed electrical outlets.  I’m really more of an idea/design person — not an actual worker bee — but that’s mostly because I lack the self-confidence and knowledge to complete some of the tasks I’d like to do.

Construction is one of those things that I know a bit about; I know nails and screws and nuts and bolts; hammers and crowbar/pullers, lumber measurements and the like.  But the actual putting together of a project scares the creep out of me.  Because math and saws and embarrassment and things falling apart.

I am surrounded by crafty people who post these really cute things they’ve done like corsages for prom, French-braids in hair, chairs, jewelry, yadda-yadda.  I decided that I was going to try my hand(s) at pallet furniture.  I’ve spent months looking at photos and websites with all manner of instructions and photos and videos.  They all make me nervous because I have little skills in fractions and all that.

My husband is pretty handy with the tools, but usually if I say I want to learn or do a project, he kind of takes over.  And, I kind of let him although it makes me mad.   So, I usually bury the craft urges unless it’s cooking or photography or sewing.

WP_20150705_001

Circular Saw

We have this lovely deck that we use all the time.  I’d love to be able to put furniture on it but the prices of patio furniture are out of my budget, so we have plastic chairs and folding chairs that get us by.  If we have a dinner on the deck, we move the dining table outside with the falling apart dining chairs (another project I imagine I can do but don’t think I possess the skills and certainly don’t possess the money to have someone do it for me).

So, I decided I wanted to build a couch with end tables out of pallets.  I gathered my pallets; free from some friends on Buy Nothing Redmond (*).  My husband and teenage son thought I had lost (what was left of) my mind but they drove around with me and loaded them in the black beast, then unloaded them to stand at the side of the house for several months.

I spent still more time looking online for photos and instructions and trying to convince myself that I could actually do this. I got an unexpected day off from nannying and decided to just get started.  None of the sites I looked at had clear, beginner’s instructions, so I asked for help from my handy-husband who promised to only help and not completely do it for me.

Couch with end tables from Pallets

Level:  Intermediate (or beginner with some really construction-minded friends)

Materials We used:

1 – 7 ft. pallet
2 – standard pallets
2 boxes #8 x 2 inch star drive coated screws (we used brown)
1 box #9 x 3 inch star drive coated screws
2 – 1″ x 6″ x 8′ pine boards
1 – 1″ x 8″ x 10′ pine board
4 x 6 pressure treated scrap lumber
1 – 2″ x 4″ x 8′ lumber
Shims

WP_20150704_010

Power driver

WP_20150704_013

Claw/puller and hammer

Tools we used:

Table saw
Circular Saw
Rafting square
Pencil
Power drill driver
Cabinet clamps
C clamps
Hammer
Screwdriver
Claw/nail puller

WP_20150704_012

Rafting square

Cost:

About $75 (without the pad and stain, just the sitting portion — no back) and about 10-20 hours of time.

So I drew a plan on a piece of paper so my husband could see what I was thinking…The basic idea is a long couch with attached end tables on feet.

WP_20150705_013

An architect I’m not…

First thing we did was talk about the plans (over a beer at our favorite Irish place).  We brainstormed and threw ideas around and decided we’d just take each step as it came because we didn’t have the dimensions of the pallets and couldn’t remember the quality the pallet wood was in.  I’m not sure the beer helped but it certainly didn’t hurt and we didn’t start the project until the next morning anyway, so not drinking while operating power tools was involved.

The next day we brought up a paint cloth to put on the deck so we didn’t scratch the decking material.  I wanted to build in place so we didn’t have to cart the huge monstrosity up some narrow deck steps.  We chose three pallets to use; the others were in pretty poor shape so we’ll use those for other projects like maybe the chicken coop.

WP_20150703_001

We laid the two shorter pallets on the ground and then the longer pallet on top.  The idea was to see what boards we needed to remove and if we needed to purchase any 1″x6″ wood (we did).  We also brought up some scrap pressure treated lumber left over from the retaining wall/fence project last year.  The plan was to use either the 4×6 or the 2×10’s for the legs.
WP_20150703_004
The next thing I did was to remove the boards we wouldn’t be using or the ones that were damaged that needed to be replaced.  YOU could remove them all and then replace them to be more spatially pleasing, or just the ones that you aren’t going to use.  The idea is that you’ll re-use them in the project somewhere else, but some of them were pretty damaged and by the time I pulled the staples or nails out others were split or damaged too.

One of the main frame 2×4’s was split so we used wood glue and clamps to hold it together.  As it was 80+ degrees this entire weekend, this was an awesome time to get a drink of water, catch some lunch and take a trip to the big box hardware store for screws and lumber.  We removed the clamps about 5 hours later.

WP_20150703_005 WP_20150703_007

The next step was to set-up some saw horses so we weren’t bending over during construction.  We laid some particle board across to stabilize them and give us a flat surface to work on.  This was pretty helpful and made it easier to get to all the angles of the project.  You will need to measure your pallet(s) to get the right length of the boards.  It’s also helpful to decide which side is the front and which side is the back of your project (I marked a “B” on the back of each short pallet and on the long pallet so we attached them correctly).

WP_20150704_008 WP_20150704_007 WP_20150704_009

Using the 2 inch screws, we attached pine boards to the short pallets to make the end tables; I chose to have 3 panels on each end as the table.   After we attached the pine boards into the end spaces to make the end tables, we took the long pallet and laid it on top; spanning the two shorter pallets / end tables.  We found we needed to remove/adjust/replace a couple of the boards on the end table pieces (under the seating pallet) to make it fit together.  When we had it square and balanced, we screwed the three pieces together with the 2 inch screws.

WP_20150704_015 WP_20150704_020
Because the ‘front’ of the couch still had some rough edges and imperfections, and for added stability, we attached a 1 x 8 x 10 ‘fascia’ board to the front to clean it up.  We had to cut a bit off the end to make it match.

WP_20150704_018Now you need to turn the entire piece upside down to install the legs.  Originally, husband wanted to use the two 4×10 pieces laid front to back with notches cut out of the middle to be the legs. One of thWP_20150705_003e boards was too short and one was too long; I told him I had envisioned legs, not bars, so we decided to cut the 4×6 into 4 pieces 16 inches in length.  We screwed them into the bottom using the 3 inch screws, stabilized them with 2 x 4 (scrap pieces cut to measurement at big-box hardware store) and shimmed as necessary.

WP_20150705_009

Shims are your friend…

WP_20150705_006

WP_20150705_010

Turned it over and we have a couch with end tables!  No back yet, but it’s time to clean up, make dinner and get ready for the work week.

WP_20150705_012

The couch is too large for the pad, but it’s comfortable!

We still have to build and install a back; we’ve gone back and forth between a static back and an adjustable back.  I thought it was too much work to build the adjustable back, so we’re just going to build a frame, attach boards to it (I’m going to find a couple more good pallets to scavenge from) and make it structurally sound with some braced 2×4’s.

Then it’s time to find a cushion for it.  I had a friend suggest that we use a futon mattress which was a fantastic idea until I discovered that the couch seat size would mean I’d need a King or California King futon mattress which run about $300 (I checked IKEA, Target, Macy’s, Sears, JCPenneys, Wayfair and Overstock).  That kind of killed the budget, so I’m back to the original plan of buying foam at the fabric store and making a slip cover for it out of patio material.  The back and the cushion will be in a 2nd post.

You might want to decide what size pad you want to use and make the project fit the pad, instead of my way.  Just a suggestion.

WP_20150704_014

The dog isn’t a necessary tool or material, but he made sure we kept on task.

(*) if you have a Buy Nothing page in your area on Facebook, I encourage you to get involved.  It is really a fun way to repurpose and recycle lots of stuff you don’t need, want or use but don’t want to sell or throw away.  I’d prefer to give stuff away than to throw it away because then someone else can use it and I don’t feel quite so guilty for letting it leave my possession.  Hoarders unite!

History and Remembrance

Standard

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it” – George Santayana

As the celebration of America’s Independence rolls around this weekend and Redmond’s 75th Derby Days Parade will be commemorated next weekend, let’s take a moment to remember the history of the city of Redmond.  What started out as a small farming and logging community has grown to a city of over 50,000 people with businesses, schools, churches and a diverse ethnic population.

“Redmond was founded by true pioneers, men and women who came up the Sammamish River to a beautiful, yet untamed wilderness. We have been pioneering ever since – first logging and farming, now microchips and bio-engineering, while in the future we look towards a diverse economy with businesses thriving in both the downtown and Overlake.”

Redmond Mayor John Marchione (from the Redmond Historical Society website)

The Nokomis Club of Redmond was formed in 1909 by six women; by 1927 had opened the first library in Redmond.  The building was housed in what is now the Half Price Books building.  By 1933 the Nokomis Club had raised enough money through bake sales and serving lunches to civic groups in the area to fund construction of a new library building, located at 16210 N.E. 80th St.  The building continued to be the clubhouse for the organization as well as a meeting place for other civic organizations until 1972 when the building was purchased by the Chamber of Commerce.  The Chamber folded and the building became the property of OneRedmond.

The building itself has not been classified as a landmark as the owner (NBE) would need to nominate the site for consideration.  King County recommended the site in both 1998 and 2005 as suitable as an historic property and building.

“The building was inventoried in historic surveys conducted in 1998 and 2005, and both surveys recommend listing it in the Local and National Register of Historic Places.  “In view of this recommendation, the association of the building with Redmond, early to mid-20th century history, and the association of the Nokomis Club with women’s history, this proposal [5-story building] would appear to have a negative impact on this historic property,” writes Gregory Griffith, Deputy State [Washington] Historic Preservation Officer, Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation, in a letter dated February 26, 2015.  Griffith concludes, “As a result, we recommend that alternative designs/site planning be explored that result in the building’s preservation/re-use on site.”  (from the Case Statement on the Nokomis website)

As the Nokomis Club was established by women and the projects and benefits to our community were organized by these women, the historical significance of the building and the meaning to the City of Redmond are substantial.  The women of the Nokomis Club were instrumental in the lives of many of our local families and continue to be a reflection of our past and a window into our future.

On July 7th, Redmond City Council will be discussing possible relocation sites for the Nokomis Buildings, as suggested by the Redmond City Council (per City Council Meeting June 16, 2015; recording/video online near the end at 56:50 the Mayor discusses questions by the council about land for the Nokomis Building {to be moved to}).

I urge you to attend the Council meeting and voice your opinion about this part of Redmond’s history.  Once it is gone, it cannot be re-created.

Nokomis Club of Redmond needs to raise approximately $25-$50,000 in order to pay for legal fees and representation as they appeal the decision to deny the historic significance of the Nokomis building in Redmond.  The hearing appealing the City of Redmond’s “Decision of Non-Significance” is scheduled for July 9th and 10th.

A separate appeal has been filed regarding the EPA’s classification of the building.

If you are interested in helping with their fight, please consider donating funds via PayPal on the Nokomis Club website or through their Crowdrise site (both listed below).

Contact the Redmond Nokomis Club:

Nokomis Club of Redmond
P.O. Box 7012
Bellevue, WA  98008-1012

Website:  www.nokomisclub98052.com

Crowdrise site:  https://www.crowdrise.com/HistoricRedmondsFirstLibrary/fundraiser/kristenbryant